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Church History

Scaldwell Church

Scaldwell Church stands on a hillside rising steeply from the north east corner of the Green and is mainly 14th century with a 12th century tower.  Inside at the bottom of the west wall there is possibly examples of Saxon stonework which may suggest and earlier church.

Main Alter

Main Altar

The main body of the church is 14th century with additions in the 15th and 19th centuries.  There are two 14th Century arcades in the nave and two arches of that date divide the east end of the north aisle from St. Edmund’s chapel and the chancel from the nave, but they were restored almost out of existence in the 1863 restoration.

Around the church are 13th Century lancet windows that have been filled in or heavily restored and re-located or even copies for use in the Victorian extensions.  The large east window over the main altar was filled with Victorian stained glass in about 1870 to 1880 and another in the south aisle has stained glass that is mid-20th Century.

Stained glass window over the main altar

Stained glass window over the main altar

 

Stained glass window in the south aisle

Stained glass window in the south aisle

There were further extensions built in 19th century, one in the south-east corner of the church for the vestry and an organ which is almost certainly by G. M. Holdich, and another in the north-west corner to provide storage area. Much of the storage space was converted into kitchen and toilet facilities in 2012.

St Edmund’s Chapel

St Edmund’s Chapel

St Edmund’s chapel was originally built by the monks of the abbey in Bury St Edmunds and renovated in 2015 and is used for a monthly mid-week Communion Service and for private prayer. The altar rail is from the semi-submerged Normanton Church at Rutland Water reservoir.

Font and font cover

Font and font cover

The font is at the rear of the church is 12th century set on two 15th century quatrefoil stone panels.  Outside to the right of the porch is the base of a Preaching Cross although the cross has been lost over the centuries.

Base of Preaching Cross near to the porch entrance

Base of Preaching Cross near to the porch entrance

On the tower is a clock by Gillet and Co. of Croydon and was placed there to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria.

7-clock-mechanism

Clock movement inside the bell tower

 There are five bells in the Tower, three made in 1621 by Hugh Watts of Leicester, one of which is quite a rare Nazarene Bell.  A fourth bell made by Henry Bagley was added in 1682 and a fifth in 1961 or 1962.  This latter bell was probably made at the Whitechapel Foundry in London.

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Sanctus bell turret

On the roof where the chancel and nave meet is a fine Sanctus bell turret though the bell is no longer in existence.